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February/March art to see

The winter session is off to a running start.  I’m happy to say that we have 7 classes completely filled.  Now it’s time to go see some art.

Michelle Handelman at Staphan Stoyanov Gallery (29 Orchard Street http://www.stephanstoyanovgallery.com/)  

This is not a show for the kiddies, in no way shape or form. Michelle’s work is video and photography based and deals with feminist issues of desire, deviant characters against pristine backgrounds.  The work is provocative and thoughtful.

James Nares at Paul Kasmin Gallery 515 West 27th Street  paulkasmingallery.com

This show is for the kiddies.  Especially kids who are interested in sculpture and stop motion animation.  The work is from 1976 and includes short films, photographs and drawings.  Nares is obsessed with a pendulum that he’s constructed and  both films depict a single, repeated action involving a Pendulum.  The haunting lyricism and anxiousness revealed in the films along with the obsessive drawings made me smile with delight.

Kakyoung Lee at Mary Ryan Gallery maryrayngallery.com till February 25th

Another great series for the stop motion kids to see.  Ms Lee shows the numerous drawings she made to create her short films.  I love her drawings and the repetitive obsessive strokes that evoke a love/hate relationship with her subject.

Sarah Sze at the Asia Society till March 25th AsiaSociet.org/Sarah Sze

This show is for everyone and is an exploration of line, literally and figuratively, across mediums from drawings to sculpture to installation. Initially trained in architecture, Sze explores how we experience space in her obsessessive use of everyday objects, collections of all sorts, and color.  Have fun, her work is thoughtful and bold!

Marble Sculptures from 350B.C to last week at Sperone Westwater Gallery speronewestwater.com till February 25th

This exhibit is a combination of both dealers: Sperone and Westwater’s 71 year old passion with collecting and history.  90% of the work is from Sperone’s private collection.  There are numerous floors and an assorted array of wonderful work.

That’s all for now.

 

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